Ashkenazi Sisters

  This collection relates to Zohar's childhood experiences: In the meticulously-kept apartment of the "Ashkenazi Sisters" (who were neighbors of Zohar's aunt), abounding with porcelain and crystal, Zohar used to regularly attend the tea ceremony. Tea was served in gold-rimmed teacups, totally ignoring the Israeli climate outside. On the other hand, a simple set of dishes was used in her childhood home with its sabra culture, which distanced itself from the bourgeoisie. As a designer, Zohar often connects between materials and aesthetic languages, as she does in this work when she connects between dignified porcelain and industrial silicone. Replacing parts of the porcelain utensils with industrial silicone arises aesthetic and functional questions.      Exhibition: The Seventh Biennale for Israeli Ceramics, Imprinting on Clay- Cultural Memory in Contemporary Ceramic Art, Eretz Israel Museum, Tel Aviv.

 

This collection relates to Zohar's childhood experiences: In the meticulously-kept apartment of the "Ashkenazi Sisters" (who were neighbors of Zohar's aunt), abounding with porcelain and crystal, Zohar used to regularly attend the tea ceremony. Tea was served in gold-rimmed teacups, totally ignoring the Israeli climate outside. On the other hand, a simple set of dishes was used in her childhood home with its sabra culture, which distanced itself from the bourgeoisie.

As a designer, Zohar often connects between materials and aesthetic languages, as she does in this work when she connects between dignified porcelain and industrial silicone.

Replacing parts of the porcelain utensils with industrial silicone arises aesthetic and functional questions.    

 Exhibition: The Seventh Biennale for Israeli Ceramics, Imprinting on Clay- Cultural Memory in Contemporary Ceramic Art, Eretz Israel Museum, Tel Aviv.